Author: Ben Young Landis

Photo composition of fruits on an old, worn bamboo cutting boardm, full of old knife marks. Some cherries are scattered to the upper left. A large mango fills the upper right corner. In the center view is a ripe avocado cut in half, exposing the large, nearly spherical seed. A whole avocado rests nearby. Water droplets adorn the fruits. The style is hypersaturated in color and contrast, accentuating the shadows and cuts. (Photo by Ben Young Landis)
Photo composition of fruits on an old, worn bamboo cutting boardm, full of old knife marks. Some cherries are scattered to the upper left. A large mango fills the upper right corner. In the center view is a ripe avocado cut in half, exposing the large, nearly spherical seed. A whole avocado rests nearby. Water droplets adorn the fruits. The style is hypersaturated in color and contrast, accentuating the shadows and cuts. Photo by Ben Young Landis
An enormous freight ship, with shipping containers stacked more than 10 layers high like toy blocks, can be seen touching both sides of the Suez Canal. It's so big that a big tractor-digger on the shore looks like a tiny insect. The foreground is stacked containers from the ship from which this photo was taken.
Photo of Mr. Spock from Star Trek, holding his hand up in the Vulcan salute, with a "V" formed by parting his fingers.

Live Long and Ever Given: A Cultural Explainer and Teachable Moment on Asian Language Bias

“It’s a weird name,” typed many a social media spectator this past week. Yes, much has been quipped of late about the Ever Given — the enormous cargo vessel that had been blocking the Suez Canal — as well as Evergreen, the Taiwanese shipping giant which owns the vessel. But the names actually serve as an example of how Asian languages and cultures often elicit a reaction of confusion or unconscious bias by Western audiences.

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An enormous freight ship, with shipping containers stacked more than 10 layers high like toy blocks, can be seen touching both sides of the Suez Canal. It's so big that a big tractor-digger on the shore looks like a tiny insect. The foreground is stacked containers from the ship from which this photo was taken.

Live Long and Ever Given: A Cultural Explainer and Teachable Moment on Asian Language Bias

“It’s a weird name,” typed many a social media spectator this past week. Yes, much has been quipped of late about the Ever Given — the enormous cargo vessel that had been blocking the Suez Canal — as well as Evergreen, the Taiwanese shipping giant which owns the vessel. But the names actually serve as an example of how Asian languages and cultures often elicit a reaction of confusion or unconscious bias by Western audiences.

Continue Reading
Children and parents gather at the Science Storytellers booth at the Family Science Days public fair hosted in Seattle by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, February 16, 2020. The photo shows scientists of diverse ethnicities and genders seated and being interviewed one-on-one by kids with pen and paper in hand. (Photo by Ben Young Landis for Science Storytellers)
Cover photo for the communicatingciencia.org website. It is a black and white photo of a gridded sheet of paper with a list of penciled words in Spanish, starting with "escribir, comunicar, informar, ciencia, cultura" and so on. A pencil appears in the background. (Graphic by Ben Young Landis)
"Mandy Mandarin" packaging design for Wild River Fruit by Ben Young Landis and Guy Rogers, as seen at a Nugget Market in West Sacramento, California. Part of the "Our Owl Friends" branding series. (Photo by Ben Young Landis. Our Owl Friends is a trademark of Wild River Marketing, Inc.)
A farmer's market stand in Sacramento, California in December 2019. Several large heads of cabbage are at the left of the shot, while tens of smaller, egg-sized cabbage are spread out to the right, with a few florets of broccoli. (Photo by Ben Young Landis)
View of the mural "I Am A Man" by Marcellous Lovelace (installed by BLK75) on South Main Street, Memphis, Tennessee, under the waning light. (Photo by Ben Young Landis)